Food / Warehousing Job Families

Retail

Food / Warehousing Job Families

Challenge: 

A holding company for food/warehousing companies wanted to standardize hiring procedures for six different job families. A review of alternative selection techniques suggested that including a personality assessment could significantly improve the selection of successful workers into each job family. The six job families consisted of:

1. Clerical: responsible for preparing and compiling documents, computing accounts, maintaining records and files, and planning, directing, and coordinating supportive services.

2. Customer Service: responsible for selling and/or supporting products and services through interaction with prospects and clients using knowledge of the industry product.

3. Sales: responsible for selling and/or supporting products and services through interaction with prospects and clients using knowledge of the industry product.

4. Operations and Trades: includes craft workers (skilled), operatives (semi-skilled), and laborers (unskilled) whose job knowledge and skills are primarily gained through on-the-job training and experience.

5. Managerial: individuals who have administrative or managerial authority over the human, physical, or financial resources of the organisation.

6. Professional: include jobs concerned with theoretical and applied aspects of such fields as art, science, engineering, education, law, computer science, business relations, andother technical specializations.

Solution: 

Hogan recommended using the Hogan Personality Inventory (HPI) and the Motives, Values,Preferences Inventory (MVPI) to identify outstanding performers in the each of the six job families. The HPI is the industry standard for measuring personality and its impact on job performance whereas the MVPI identifies how well individuals fit within an organisation’s culture.

Specifically, Hogan conducted multiple criterion-referenced validation studies where current incumbents within each job family completed the two assessments and then their supervisors provided ratings on multiple job performance measures.

Result: 

Hogan demonstrated that remaining calm under pressure and exhibiting a positive work attitude are important for effective job performance, regardless of the job family under consideration. In addition, certain characteristics play a larger role in determining successful job performance for some job families compared to others. For example, Sales people are more outgoing and enjoy social interactions compared to Managers who are more ambitious and driven to exceed and deliver results. Based on this research, Hogan customized selection guidelines using scales from both the HPI and MVPI to meet the unique profiles of each job family.

To illustrate how these selection recommendations would work in practice, Hogan compared those passing each job family profile to those not passing the profile. These comparisons showed that:

  • clerical workers passing the high fit profile were nearly seven times more likely to be a high performer compared to those not fitting the high fit profile
  • professional workers passing the high fit profile were three times as likely to be a higher performer relative to those not passing the high fit profile
  • managerial, operations and trades, customer service, and sales workers passing the high fit profile were twice as likely to be a higher performer relative to those not passing the high fit profile

Taken together these results show not only how using the HPI and MVPI can improve identification of successful workers, but also how this improved selection process can translate into measurable performance outcomes.